Beach Cruisers
 TX200, OBX130, FL110, Everglades Challenge, and numerous similar events have brought both interest and focus to the new breed of beach cruiser designs
more...
The Bay...
Very happy to have made it sailing on the Chesapeake Bay this year. Truly a 'bucket list' item. Keeping the boat near the West River - a nice piece of the Bay indeed. Great area for gunk-holing and the easy lifestyle.

more...
Pine Tree 150
Preliminary planning for a small sail raid event in New England.
Big thanks to OarClub member Chris Mullins - looks like it will be a near replica of the Maine (the Pine Tree state) cruise he documented.

more...
The new Uber boats
Thinking outside the box - some really exciting creations find their way into the domain of small cruisers and raid event boats. To think there's an alternative to the 4ksb is abhorrent! Be abhorred

more...
Classe Quindici (15)

A class for small boat builders, designers, tinkerers, inventors.


more...
Micro Multihulls
Small boats are challenging for weeking cruising - because of low speed it's not easy to cover miles. An alternative - a micro multihull to expand your range.
more...
My special trimaran
After firts launchThis is the special boat - a rehab of a Lock Crowther designed Twiggy-class trimaran. She's 32 feet long and 30 feet wide.

more...
Florida Keys
The Florida Keys are a great cruising ground - know the rules - get the local knowledge - meet the local sailors - eat the local cuisine - and have fun. From my stint in the Keys - here's a thumbnail of one of the spots where I was able to spend some time.
more...
Good Examples
Judy and Tom Cox are good examples for serious cruisers. They've documented their Bahamas and Abacos cruises -there's a lot to learn here...

more...
The Rocky Rail
The cruising sailors friend - a self tacking jib. This design can be adapted to most boats with little problem and a few simple modifications.

more...
Jester Challenge 2010
Zaretsly and McDougallIron men, the Jester Challenge sailors, 30' boats, no fees, no rules, just sailing across the Atlantic from Plymouth, UK to Newport, R.I. An hour and a half separated the top two finishers Zarestsky, left, Peterson 25 and McDougal, right, Wharram 21 after 33 days of racing.
more...
Yet another perfect boat...
And her name is?Will I ever tire of changing boats like they were old socks? I don't think so.  I recently found a very nice example of the S2 built 6.9 series boats. The pro's and con's are interesting...
more...
Kid stuff
Sistership Ramblings on a memorable cruise with my then 13 yr old daughter. A 25 year old story, but it makes me smile when I remember those sweet days...
more...
Where does the $7.00 go?
UK Gas PricesCourage is the dearest commodity - when no one has any.  So, let's ask the question: Who gets the money when government fails to step up and do what's needed.
more...
Regatta Time
Russ Brown's proa It's Abacos Regatta Time again: 1st week of July. Go to RTIA-2010 for more info. Damn it we just gotta get there one of these days.
The Bahamas
My hammockMy first dream is to have a home in Ireland - second is being able to cruise several months a year in the Bahamas.
more...
 
Favorite Links



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--- 249 --- Now Explode $result= Array ( [0] => Array ( [text] =>   [id] => 89 [type] => content [category] => News,Boats [categurl] => [url] => [descript] => Beach Cruisers [thumbnail] => [intro] =>  TX200, OBX130, FL110, Everglades Challenge, and numerous similar events have brought both interest and focus to the new breed of beach cruiser designs ) [1] => Array ( [text] =>
All around friendly people every where I went - and you don't find that everywhere. I guess the local population is pretty much all real water people - which makes it nice.

Need to make plans now... for the next sailing adventure (the Bahamas?) and the next boat - stay tuned...

[id] => 74 [type] => content [category] => News [categurl] => [url] => [descript] => The Bay... [thumbnail] => [intro] => Very happy to have made it sailing on the Chesapeake Bay this year. Truly a 'bucket list' item. Keeping the boat near the West River - a nice piece of the Bay indeed. Great area for gunk-holing and the easy lifestyle.
) [2] => Array ( [text] =>

This was the cruise, in short...

Wed 1 July: Belfast Harbor to Cradle Cove, Seven Hundred Acre Island.
Thu 2 July: Cradle Cove to Camden, then Rockland.
Fri 3 July: Rockland to Carver Cove,Vinalhaven Island via Fox Island Thorofare.
Sat 4 July: Carver Cove to Northhaven, then to Bass Harbor, Mt. Desert Island via Deer Island Thorofare and Casco Passage.
Sun 5 July: Bass Harbor to Somesville, Head of Somes Sound, then Northeast Harbor.
Mon 6 July: Northeast Harbor to Blue Hill Harbor.
Tue 7 July: Blue Hill Harbor to Bucks Harbor via Eggemoggin Reach.
Wed 8 July: Bucks Harbor to Belfast Harbor.

Chris' cruise was the above 8-day time frame. Am thinking of modifying some legs so that the primary course will be fall inside of one week - but allow for an optional extended version for those who want to enjoy the full length cruise. [id] => 86 [type] => content [category] => Trips,Boats [categurl] => [url] => [descript] => Pine Tree 150 [thumbnail] => [intro] => Preliminary planning for a small sail raid event in New England.
Big thanks to OarClub member Chris Mullins - looks like it will be a near replica of the Maine (the Pine Tree state) cruise he documented.
) [3] => Array ( [text] =>

This new crop of small boats or microcruisers as some call them - whatever you call them, call them fast - and capable.


Winning the ECSome of the fiercest examples come from the board of Graham Byrnes of B&B Yacht Designs. Shown here is "Suthern Skimmer" - his Everglades Challenge 22 design targeted at winning the Everglades Challenge.
[id] => 85 [type] => content [category] => Boats [categurl] => [url] => [descript] => The new Uber boats [thumbnail] => [intro] => Thinking outside the box - some really exciting creations find their way into the domain of small cruisers and raid event boats. To think there's an alternative to the 4ksb is abhorrent! Be abhorred
) [4] => Array ( [text] => Not my idea - but I'm going to do what I can to help build interest and spread the word among the tinkerers, inventors, and other creative small boat builders and sailors.

This class is modeled after the small boat class in Italy called "Classe Diecipiede" which essentially is just a 10 foot rule, nothing else. More simple then the already simple PDR class.

But, as you can see from the photos shown here of the boats in their 10-foot class - they get an enormous amount of interest in a wide range of boat types.Born from a discussion on the multihulls maillist (steamradio), where there were questions raised about what would stimulate new participants in sailing and racing which degenerated, as is typical when there's a variety of persons with strong interest and ideas, into various debates on what the rules should be.

The discussion - not the conclusions - pointed to a split between those looking for rules governing everything (including attempts to control costs), or a design contest for a new and better  one-design (multihull naturally), or some new small boat development class. I favor the latter so I'm throwing my oar in and starting it off by outlining the rationale (as I see it) and a proposed rule.

The above mentioned Classe Dieci Piedi struck me especially in the way that their rule was very little rule at all and clearly included all types of boats - and strangely enough, had a wide range of types involved in the races. From scows to trimarans and even proas.

To my way of thinking that is a great development class that a lot of people can bring their preferences to the design game and not be excluded -- thereby not ruling out folks that might be interested otherwise.

So back to the intentions behind the rule... boats will be able to be built with 8 foot plywood panels based on a single scarf and most boats can be built in a standard car garage. Small enough and light (weight & $$) enough to be a reasonable parent/child project. Simple enough to be able to pirate rigs and gear from a variety of existing small boats. Open enough rule to bring in a wide range of existing boats. Big enough to be useful for family sailing, weekend gunkholing, and raid events.

And not to be forgotten - the good old days, when we long in the tooth multi-hullers were uniformly ruled out of most organized racing - this rule will NOT rule any boats out based on hull type, period.

The point here is NOT a specific length, its about picking a length that includes LOTS of existing boats (two sheets of plywood long is a popular cutoff for home builders) and is a length that would attract new builders of beach cruisers and expedition sailors as newcomers.

So, to a rule:
LOA includes the hull(s) between perpendiculars (does not include rudders hung on transom nor removable bow poles).
BOA includes everything fixed or movable.
No trapeze/hiking/wings outside the 15 ft boa (i.e. crew inside the gunwale)
No fixed ballast. Water ballast may be allowed when singlehanded.
No limitations on hull shape, number of hulls, etc.
Underwater foils limited to vertical surfaces only. The class is not intended to promote 'moth foiler' type boats.

If sail area becomes part of the rule, then it would include the area of the mast in profile to account for wing masts / solid sails.

Some of the already popular and well proven small boats that would fit inside the class rules.

Michael Storer: fabulous "Goat Island Skiff" -or his currently under development "Raid41"
Graham Byrnes: "Core Sound 15" -pump it up-
John Welsford: "Saturday Night Special" -not officially released yet- which is a slick design that would stretch to the class limit nicely.
Richard Woods: builds his "Strike 15" shows (see YouTube) that it's fast.

Already have a boat up to 15.9 feet long? It probably meets the class rules - just bring it to any Quindici Regatta and come sailing!  If it is close to the limits then ask for a vote of the attending skippers and you will probably be welcomed to join the racing as a "friend of the family" contestant.

My working title for the class is "Classe Quindici" (class 15) - paying homage to the Italian pioneers of the basic framework. [id] => 79 [type] => content [category] => Boats [categurl] => [url] => [descript] => Classe Quindici (15) [thumbnail] => [intro] =>

A class for small boat builders, designers, tinkerers, inventors.

) [5] => Array ( [text] =>

Good examples of a simple camp-cruiser based on  production hulls and rig. The RusselBrown-PaulBeiker and and the Kelsall Typhoon look exciting.

Sorry - we do NOT have contact information for any of these boats.

Try the various mail-lists to find the perpetrators ;-)

More pix of the Russ Brown / Paul Beiker design












 The rare but very interesting Derek Kelsall Typhoon

Kelsall Typhoon
[id] => 84 [type] => content [category] => Boats [categurl] => [url] => [descript] => Micro Multihulls [thumbnail] => [intro] => Small boats are challenging for weeking cruising - because of low speed it's not easy to cover miles. An alternative - a micro multihull to expand your range. ) [6] => Array ( [text] =>


Originally designed for the OSTAR - a singlehanded transatlantic race from west to east, ending in Newport, RI.

She has a compact but complete cabin forward and a mini sleeping double cabin aft. Quite a departure from the accommodation in today's coffin-style offshore racing boats


 The boat has a new nav station - added as part of my refurb.





Redid the galley shown here, added a FL-legal pump-out head, and refitted to all synthetic standing rigging.










Also did a complete rebuild of the wing-mast, the crossbeams, the cockpit coamings, added access hatches to the amas, installed an autopilot and hooked it to the GPS.



The wing mast was a total revelation - the Gougeon-designed wing was much more efficient than expected. She would go hard upwind at 9 knots  - and she'd do it with substantially  less than 80 degrees between tacks.

Here's Coral Queen on her mooring in Boot Key Harbor.

The City Marina at Marathon FL was great - the friendly and kind folks there made it a real pleasure .

Also pictured: Bantu - a great CSK catamaran, and Tres Reys - a very well appointed and maintained open wing Piver.

Who said Oldies weren't Goodies!



[id] => 78 [type] => content [category] => Boats [categurl] => [url] => [descript] => My special trimaran [thumbnail] => [intro] => After firts launchThis is the special boat - a rehab of a Lock Crowther designed Twiggy-class trimaran. She's 32 feet long and 30 feet wide.
) [7] => Array ( [text] =>



Key West:
Cudjoe Key:
Big Pine Key
Vaca Key
Boot Key Harbor, Marathon, FL


You can JUST barely make out the very wide trimaran I had at the time.


Coral Queen is on her mooring - in the first row, running along the channel in front of the condos, sixth boat counting from left to right.

[id] => 83 [type] => content [category] => Trips,Boats [categurl] => [url] => [descript] => Florida Keys [thumbnail] => [intro] => The Florida Keys are a great cruising ground - know the rules - get the local knowledge - meet the local sailors - eat the local cuisine - and have fun. From my stint in the Keys - here's a thumbnail of one of the spots where I was able to spend some time. ) [8] => Array ( [text] =>


These great sailors and inveterate cruisers will captivate you with their cruising stories. 

Their website has the details...

Abacos 2001

Bahamas 2002

[id] => 82 [type] => content [category] => Trips,Boats [categurl] => [url] => [descript] => Good Examples [thumbnail] => [intro] => Judy and Tom Cox are good examples for serious cruisers. They've documented their Bahamas and Abacos cruises -there's a lot to learn here...
) [9] => Array ( [text] => This system is used on a Merit 25, I=28.75 ft (8.76 m) and J=9.66 ft (2.94 m). The boat is 24.5 ft (7.47 m) long and weighs 3,120 lb (1,415 kg) in measurement trim.

Quoting from Fishmeal:

"The decision to develop a "floating track" for a self-tacking jib was driven by two considerations:

1) The boat is heavily raced and often sails with 150% or larger overlapping deck-sweeping jibs. A conventional track would be a serious obstruction during tacks. But unlike a fixed track, the ends of the floating track lie flat on the deck when not in use (and the track is easily unrigged and removed to clean things up even more on light-air days).

2) The elimination of the sheet block on the car allows the radius of the track to be larger without violating the "low energy at the ends" condition necessary for easy self-tacking. Rule of thumb for conventional (Soling style) self-tacking tracks is to have track radius approximately equal to the J measurement. For the floating track, radius equal to half the jib hoist appears more then adequate, and a larger radius (nearly straight) track would probably work".

 Diagram This picture gives a good idea of the simplicity of adapting the "Rocky Rail" to almost any boat -- DO NOT just copy this make sure to get the whole story and see the MkIIver2 info -- you really need to read the whole story - it can be found at the Fishmeal Site site.

[id] => 80 [type] => content [category] => Boats [categurl] => [url] => [descript] => The Rocky Rail [thumbnail] => [intro] => The cruising sailors friend - a self tacking jib. This design can be adapted to most boats with little problem and a few simple modifications.
) [10] => Array ( [text] =>



There are nine boats still sailing

The tracks and positions of boats reporting can be viewed on www.oceanracetrack.com, the tradionalists remain in stealth mode.

Arrivals:
1st      Igor Zaretskiy on The Grand, a Peterson 25,
      Arrived 26.06.10 @0200 EST. 33 days 19 hours.
2nd.    Rory McDougall on Cooking Fat, a Wharram Tiki 21
      Arrived 26.06.10 @ 0300 EST. 33 days 20 hours 30 mins.
3rd.     Roger Fitzgerald on Ella Trout III, a Dehler 29.
       Arrived 27.06.10 @ 17.31.59 UTC. 34 days.

Moer as info becomes available...

[id] => 66 [type] => content [category] => Boats [categurl] => [url] => [descript] => Jester Challenge 2010 [thumbnail] => [intro] => Zaretsly and McDougallIron men, the Jester Challenge sailors, 30' boats, no fees, no rules, just sailing across the Atlantic from Plymouth, UK to Newport, R.I. An hour and a half separated the top two finishers Zarestsky, left, Peterson 25 and McDougal, right, Wharram 21 after 33 days of racing. ) [11] => Array ( [text] =>


Pro's:
Con's:

[id] => 73 [type] => content [category] => News [categurl] => [url] => [descript] => Yet another perfect boat... [thumbnail] => [intro] => And her name is?Will I ever tire of changing boats like they were old socks? I don't think so.  I recently found a very nice example of the S2 built 6.9 series boats. The pro's and con's are interesting... ) [12] => Array ( [text] => It started out as a delivery trip - the boat at the time was an Olson 30 ULDB which I had brought back with me from along term project in Newport Beach - now it needed to be moved from another work location at Oyster Bay, Long Island to my home port Salem, Mass. I did have a new trailer for the boat, and could have towed her home , but this delivery became a potential cruise when Dad realized his oldest daughter had a week of vacation to donate to the delivery trip. The Henry family has slightly different recollections.

Not planning for the obvious, an outboard that never had run before and was little more than an ornament hanging off the transom bracket, the 'vacation week' ended up stretching considerably.

Jennifer and I cruised from Oyster Bay to Salem with numerous gunk-hole stopovers along the Connecticut shore, then Pt. Judith, Menemsha, Vineyard Haven, thru Woods Hole into Buzzards Bay, and finally via the Cape Cod Canal to Provincetown for final leg to Salem.

This cruise took place in 1986. In the early spring - 3 weeks from late April into early May. That's still 'early season' here in New England - marinas and yacht clubs are mostly still buttoned  up, not even with floats in the water - only the sea dogs and fishermen are out and about - and the weather can be less than tropical.

 Fortunately for me, both of our kids like the water, like sailing, and are good sailors. They began sailing in grammar school, added the experience of sailing camp out of Pleon, and frequently took over sailing our boats themselves. I always thought it a stroke of luck that one prefered the tiller while the other prefered the fun of trimming - gosh how blessed can a father be.

As you might imagine, there were a few back-stories.

Mother's memories of some of my prior escapades definitely added a certain spicy flavor to the requisite updates which we were delinquent in providing along the way (those memories included a two-handed Bermuda race and a USCG search for our boat  (because it was misidentified by another racer, hence considered 'overdue' ;-)

 Jennifer's school chum's and teachers we tracking our progress on a regular basis - especially after the legitimate 'vacation week' expired and we kept extending the ETA and thus her return for school - all unbeknownst to us travellers.

 We'll cover the hiighlights: Nuclear sub surfacing off New London, incredulous barflys at many Yacht clubs, a cupcake 14th birthday party, Pt. Judith's hippy culture, the jetties entering Menemsha, lady boatbuilders of Vinyard Haven, adventures in Wood's Hole cut, sailing the CC Canal, sleeping on beam-ends in P-town, plus more.

I'm going to ask Jennifer to contribute -- from her original "log" of our trip.  It's too precious to leave out.

 More anon...

[id] => 23 [type] => content [category] => News,Henrys,Trips,Boats [categurl] => [url] => [descript] => Kid stuff [thumbnail] => [intro] => Sistership Ramblings on a memorable cruise with my then 13 yr old daughter. A 25 year old story, but it makes me smile when I remember those sweet days... ) [13] => Array ( [text] =>

We saw the demand for gasoline shrink substantially when prices went toward $5.00 / gal - but not before that. So, we learned that there is a point  at which US consumer behavior would change - contrary to the baloney we were being served up by the pundits that said Americans would drive their gas guzzlers no matter what the price - so there was no sense in trying to do  anything to forc conservation. But, low and behold when prices finally were forced to the extreme the demand did go down and conservation went into effect  - reducing  our dependence on foreign oil suppliers.
 
The answer (well my answer really) to the question "where does the money go?" is that with low gasoline taxes in the US then our money ends up going to the oil suppliers. But, if taxes on gasoline were double (or triple) then the higher prices would reduce consumption ( a good thing), we learned that already, and more of the money would then stay in the US and benefit  consumers in the form of financing government - instead of financing the oil producers.

Now don't sneer at "financing government" - down deep, like it or not, you really know that our schools, our roads, our businesses, our health care, our social security & medicare are all "financed by  the government"

Since the price of gasoline and other fuels is now as dependent on international tensions and speculators as anything else I say we might as well be keeping as much of it at home as we can!

Time for voters to show (by voting) their elected representatives that they will no longer be any excuses if they don't do what so obviously needed.

[id] => 70 [type] => content [category] => News [categurl] => [url] => [descript] => Where does the $7.00 go? [thumbnail] => [intro] => UK Gas PricesCourage is the dearest commodity - when no one has any.  So, let's ask the question: Who gets the money when government fails to step up and do what's needed. ) [14] => Array ( [text] => [id] => 21 [type] => content [category] => News,Boats [categurl] => [url] => [descript] => Regatta Time [thumbnail] => [intro] => Russ Brown's proa It's Abacos Regatta Time again: 1st week of July. Go to RTIA-2010 for more info. Damn it we just gotta get there one of these days.
) [15] => Array ( [text] =>

 

 

 

 The EC22 would be a great little Bahamas Cruiser - able to skip over tha shallows and slide right up to the beach.

[id] => 5 [type] => content [category] => News,Trips,Boats [categurl] => [url] => [descript] => The Bahamas [thumbnail] => [intro] => My hammockMy first dream is to have a home in Ireland - second is being able to cruise several months a year in the Bahamas. ) )


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